Showing posts with label fashion. Show all posts
Showing posts with label fashion. Show all posts

Monday, May 26, 2014

Dolly Dearest (1992)

Repost from 2011.

Dir. Maria Lease || 1992 || USA

Apparently made in the post-Child's Play glut of killer doll films, Dolly Dearest tends to fall flat and become quite dull when we're not watching the doll wreak havoc on the family or the Mexican people employed at either their house or the small rundown doll factory that the father owns and runs. Maybe this film is a metaphor for keeping work in the US instead of going to another country to take advantage of cheap labor and factories.

Much like Child's Play, the dolls are possessed, but not by a serial killer. They are possessed by the spirit of a child devil worshipped by a group of ancient Satanists.* Archeologist Rip Torn (sporting a weak Mexican accent until he has to forcefully yell at someone) investigates the tomb neighboring the doll factory after his friend and co-worker dies in the tomb. His death unleashed the spirit of the child devil via sub-Ghostbusters technology, and the spirit found its way into the doll factory, where the last owner left a dozen or so set of dolls that all looked alike. The family of the new factory owner settles into their house. Jessica, the daughter, is given a doll from the factory and becomes immediately attached to it. Then she starts displaying weird behavior. The film can never quite settle on whether Jessica is possessed or not. I get the feeling the child actress was hired primarily on her resemblance to Drew Barrymore when she was a child. The mom is the only one who notices the change. Poor mom is forced to stay at home all day and unpack their belongings.

Like I mentioned before, there is not enough crazy doll action to make this film worthwhile. The doll contorts her face and yells to surprise all her victims before attacking. It's funny. Also funny is that the doll's giggle sounds like the noise of blowing bubbles into a drink. Unfortunately, Dolly Dearest is too caught up in subplots for there to be much doll action at all.

At least the mom had some nice clothes:




*March is not only Women's History Month, but apparently Satanists month here at the blog. I'm going to have to create a tag before March is over.

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Tank Girl (1995)

Dir. Rachel Talalay || 1995 || USA

I remember liking Tank Girl as a teen in the 1990s, but looking at it now, it's easy to see what a mess this film is. It's not an odd or even fully enjoyable mess, and it's only occasionally amusing. It can't be chalked up to inexperience or disinterest in the source material, qualities that tend to factor into the better comic book films; because Talalay was an experienced director at this point and did like the material. But by all accounts, there was a lot of studio interference with the film because up until this past decade, very few people knew what to do with comic books or graphic novels as source material. The film is live action, but it also has clips from the comic books and animation sequences.

Most post-apocalyptic films tend to have a timeless quality to them, no matter what decade they were made in. Tank Girl is so 90s it hurts. The situation that the film takes place in is timeless - where a comet hit Earth and it hasn't rained in 11 years, so water is high in demand and only a select few has access to it. But everything else is 90s. Considering that one of the first places I was introduced to Tank Girl was an article in Harper's Bazaar, the fashion magazine (yeah, I read this as a teen, what?), the film is very high on costume changes (IMDB counts 18 for Lori Petty as Tank Girl) and it's all very punk-grunge-pseudo-riot grrrl. Even The Rippers dress in 90s clothing (flannel shirts and t-shirts, one Ripper looks like a half-man-half-kangaroo member of Color Me Badd). It's funny that in the comic's revival in the mid-2000s by IDW Publishing, Tank Girl was drawn as wearing a lot of 1980s power suits because the reasoning was along the lines of "a lot of people still dress like Tank Girl from the 1990s, it's no longer edgy." The soundtrack, supervised by Courtney (Love, Love-Cobain, whatever she's calling herself now) is sort of a mix of good 90s music and music that never made it past that decade, along with some bizarre covers (like Devo covering Soundgarden's cover of Devo's "Girl U Want", or something).

Tank Girl is an overwhelmingly cartoon-y film. And yeah, Tank Girl is a cartoon character even in the comics, but on film it's ridiculous. The film just meanders. The sense of urgency towards saving the little girl that lived with Tank Girl is never there because of all the side missions that are jokes and costume changes. It would almost be a parody if the film could settle on anything whatsoever, other than being a valentine to Tank Girl as a fashion icon of sorts, and occasionally her other positive attributes; like being a good friend or being a loud-mouthed and brave woman.

The one thing that I will give the film is that for much of the film, Tank Girl and Jet Girl (Naomi Watts!) have realistically post-apocalyptic water shortage greasy hair. Do you know how rare that is in post-apocalyptic films? Although Tank Girl's makeup rarely smudges, even when being in a torture chamber for what seems like a couple of days.